Sermon of the Week: “Loyalty and Love” by Pastor Lindell Cooley

Each week I’ll be posting a sermon of the week. The featured sermon will be one that has spoken volumes and given me inspiration, comfort, and good hard look at something God is trying to show me through His word.

This week’s featured sermon is “Loyalty and Love” by Pastor Lindell Cooley from Grace Church in Nashville, Tennessee.

Reflections on Psalm 2

“Why do the nations conspire
    and the peoples plot in vain?
The kings of the earth rise up
    and the rulers band together
    against the Lord and against his anointed, saying,
“Let us break their chains
    and throw off their shackles.”

The One enthroned in heaven laughs;
    the Lord scoffs at them.
He rebukes them in his anger
    and terrifies them in his wrath, saying,
“I have installed my king

    on Zion, my holy mountain.”

I will proclaim the Lord’s decree:

He said to me, “You are my son;
    today I have become your father.
Ask me,
    and I will make the nations your inheritance,
    the ends of the earth your possession.
You will break them with a rod of iron[b];

    you will dash them to pieces like pottery.”

Therefore, you kings, be wise;
    be warned, you rulers of the earth.
Serve the Lord with fear
    and celebrate his rule with trembling.
Kiss his son, or he will be angry
    and your way will lead to your destruction,
for his wrath can flare up in a moment.
    Blessed are all who take refuge in him.”
– Psalm 2:1-12 (NIV)

So, I’ve been trying to pray through the Psalms for the last couple of days and I just wanted to share my reflections with you on this passage. I’m going to try not to get into the deep theology of the text, and just get to what I felt that God was trying to show me.

This morning as I as was getting ready to the open the store that I work at, Psalm 2:1 just kept going through my mind. “Why do the heathen rage? Why do the people imagine a vain thing?” (I think Scripture in KJV because I was raised on it.) What is the psalmist really asking here?

In this passage, the psalmist is addressing kings and leaders that would try to overthrow the dominion of God in the earth. In Colossians 1, we read about how Jesus has created everything, sustains everything, and is ruling all of creation. Any power or authority that anyone has politically or otherwise comes from God.

“Everyone must submit to governing authorities. For all authority comes from God, and those in positions of authority have been placed there by God. So anyone who rebels against authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and they will be punished.”
– Romans 13:1-2 (NLT)

So, what does all this mean on a practical level?

Revelation 1:6 tells us that we are kings and priests unto God. Because we are kings and priests unto God, we always answer to Him for everything we say and do. As a matter of fact, the Scriptures are clear that we will have to give an account for our works (Ecclesiastes 12:13-14; Matthew 12:36-37; 1 Corinthians 3:12-15). When we don’t surrender our lives under the full authority of Jesus Christ we become just like these foolish rulers that David is addressing in Psalm 2. When we try to direct our lives without God we are simply plotting in vain and setting ourselves up for disaster.

Sabbath Rest and Common Grace From the Front Porch

From where I’m sitting, on the front porch of my Grandparent’s house in Dover, Arkansas, the earth moves slower. The sun rises and sets slower here than anywhere else. It is here on this front porch in this rural community where I see God’s common grace the most. If there was ever a place exemplified sabbath rest, it’s here. It is an atmosphere of peace, solitude, and rest that seems to melt away the cares of this veil. It is a healthy and wholesome thing for every person to have a place like this to think, to pray, to focus, to gather, and to regroup. So, my question to you is this: where is your place like this? Where is your place to sit and solve the world’s problems? Where is your place to rest and get away for awhile? Did you know that the Bible actually commands rest?

 

“Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.” – [Exodus 20:8-11 ESV]

 

And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath.” – [Mark 2:27 ESV]

 

I believe that rest in and of itself is a form of common grace. Why? Because everyone enjoys rest at some point. It’s a universal concept enjoyed by converted and the unconverted alike. Even workaholics have to sleep sometime and whether they want to admit it or not, they enjoy the feeling of their head hitting the cool side of the pillow. Why do we need a sabbath rest? Because we’re only human. The sin nature that we inherited from our father Adam causes work to be toilsome and as a result, our bodies ache and become sore. If we overwork our bodies, they get hurt, bones break, muscles get torn, and so forth. Because we are sinful, we have one of two equally sinful extremes that we revert to in response to work. We either avoid work altogether and become lazy, or we go overboard and work ourselves to death without ever resting. Albert Barnes’ gives a picture of what it looks like to rest biblically without being lazy.

 

For his rest from toil, his rest from the cares and anxieties of the world, to give him an opportunity to call off his attention from earthly concerns and to direct it to the affairs of eternity. It was a kind provision for man that he might refresh his body by relaxing his labors; that he might have undisturbed time to seek the consolations of religion to cheer him in the anxieties and sorrows of a troubled world; and that he might render to God that homage which is most justly due to him as the Creator, Preserver, Benefactor, and Redeemer of the world.”
– Albert Barnes’ Notes on the New Testament (On Mark 2:27)

 

There’s a quote from Perry Noble that I think is very applicable here. “Refusing to work is lazy, refusing to rest is disobedient.” We commit sin when we take it upon ourselves to work beyond the physical limitations that God has set for our bodies. Sometimes we need to rest and in our resting, give glory to God who gave us the ability to work and rest.

 

The Closet Concept

“And whenever you pray, do not be like the hypocrites; for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, so that they may be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward. But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you.”
– Matthew 6:5-6 (NRSV)

“Prayer is the most powerful resource we have in this life; yet, many only turn to it as a last resort. When unbelievers pray for repentance of sin and ask for God’s forgiveness, prayer is the spiritual dynamite that obliterates the darkness and despair of a sin-soaked soul.” – Franklin Graham

A while back I preached on the subject of the Prayer Closet. I’ve found myself being gripped again by the conviction of the Holy Spirit about this subject. I’ve failed in my own life to pray like I should. I have a great head knowledge of prayer, but the journey from my head to my heart seems to be longer than it seems.

God has been showing me recently that effective prayer will always do one of two things. It will change the situation or it will change how you view the situation.

When Jesus tells us to pray, He tells us to go into our room. I’m old school, so I prefer how the King James renders the word “room”. It calls it the “closest”. The word “closest” might give us the mental imagery of that miscellaneous room in our house where we keep coats, jackets, old clothes, board games, and various other things. But, what do we put in the closet? What do the coats, jackets, old clothes, and various other things have in common? Why do we put them in the closet? It’s simple. We don’t want to deal with them.

So, what is Jesus saying when He tells us to go into our closet? Is it so we can have private time with God? Certainly that’s part of it because Jesus even says that the hypocrites love to stand in the street corners and the synagogues and pray publicly, and He tells us not to be like them. But I think there’s another aspect of the closet that we’re missing. The closets in Jesus’ day weren’t much different than our closets today. They were storage spaces, and guess what went in their closets. That’s right. Crap they didn’t want to deal with.

In Jesus’ command for us to go into the closet and pray is not just a command to pray privately, but a command to confront issues in our life that we’ve dismissed and just don’t want to deal with anymore. Maybe there is habitual sins in our lives that we’ve tried to hide away from everyone else and shove into our proverbial closet, but Jesus clearly sees what we choose not to see and implores us to to go to Him in our prayer closet confront everything that might hinder from a deeper walk with Him.

In the NKJV, Matthew 6:6 reads like this:

“But you, when you pray, go into your room, and when you have shut your door, pray to your Father who is in the secret place; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you openly.”

It actually implies that our Father is in the secret place waiting on us to come to Him in prayer. He’s excited to hear from us in prayer, and He longs for us to allow Him to work in our lives and deal with those issues that we’ve shoved away for so long.