A Mental Buffet // 24 June 2017

Mental Buffet

This week’s mental buffet.

The Hope Of Believers In Death – Dylan Justus (we’re kinda biased towards this article for obvious reasons) 

“The Gospel is about bringing dead people to life. When you were dead in your sins (Ephesians 2:1) the Holy Spirit convicted you of your sins, gave you faith and regenerated your heart. You needed a Savior because Adam sinned and plunged all of creation into sin; Jesus is that Savior!”

 

Move in with a Prophet – Marci Preheim  

“Sometimes Christians read their Bibles and pray because that’s what they are supposed to do rather than reading and praying because they actually believe there’s power there.”

 

Messy Saints – Erick Sorensen 

“A saint is indeed perfect. But that status of “uber-holy” isn’t based on their own perfection or holiness, but Christ’s perfection and holiness for them. A saint in biblical terminology is simply someone who has been saved by God through the work of Jesus Christ and imputed with His righteousness, being set apart for service to Him. So guess what? You sitting there reading this right now, who struggle with pride, lust, despair, addiction, and a whole host of other sins, God does not define you by those things. In Christ, He defines you as His saint!”

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The Hope Of Believers In Death

The first question of the New City Catechism states: “What is our only hope in life and death? That we are not our own but belong, body and soul, both in life and death, to God and to our savior Jesus Christ.”

What a great hope! But what is that hope rooted in? What is it’s basis? It’s rooted in the resurrection of Christ! In 1 Corinthians 15 the Apostle Paul pens fifty-eight verses explaining and applying the resurrection of Christ. I want to point out three things that I see in these fifty-eight verses that speak to the hope that we have in both our own death and the death of a loved one, if they are a believer. 

First, the Gospel is verified in and by the resurrection of Christ. “For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive” (15:22). The Gospel is about bringing dead people to life. When you were dead in your sins (Ephesians 2:1) the Holy Spirit convicted you of your sins, gave you faith and regenerated your heart. You needed a Savior because Adam sinned and plunged all of creation into sin; Jesus is that Savior! But how does this verify the Gospel, you might ask? Because without the resurrection Jesus Christ saves us no more than having a life jacket on next to you saves you from drowning. We can tell people all day long that Christ died for their sins, but if we don’t tell them that Christ rose from the grave it means absolutely nothing! 

Second, the resurrection promises us a new, glorified body. Our bodies are ravished by the effects of sin. Sickness and death are two inescapable effects of Adam’s sin. Our bodies deteriorate, and eventually decompose into the dust from which they came, but not our new glorified body. Our glorified body, free from sin and it’s effects, is not an earthly body but a heavenly one. Paul writes in 15:44 “It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body.” Our new body is “raised in glory” (15:43), just like Jesus. 

Lastly, in the resurrection sin has lost its sting. What does Paul mean by “sting”? 15:56 sheds some light for us. According to Paul the sting of death is sin, and the power of sin (or maybe another way of saying it is “the fuel of sin”) is the Law. The Law of God does not save, rather it condemns. Two observations concerning the Law: 1) The Law is a mirror, revealing our sin to us (Romans 7:7-12). 2) Bondage to the Law “arouses” sinful passions within us. Why is it that when you put a sign up that says “Do Not Touch” we are always tempted to touch it? Because in our sinful and fallen nature we eagerly do contrary to what is commanded. The same is true with going against and breaking God’s Law. As unregenerate people, when we see the Law of God our instinct is to either rely upon it to save us or push against it in utter rebellion. The Law fuels our sinfulness, not because the Law is evil, but because it calls us to a holy life that sinners aren’t interested in living. 

Back to determining what Paul meant by “sting”! He says that the sting of death is sin, but death has now lost its sting (i.e. sin). In the resurrection of Christ, Christ has set us free from sin. Sin no longer has a grasp on those who have turned and repented of their sins. 

In conclusion I want to tie this into the hope that believers have in both their death and the death of loved ones who have professed genuine faith in Christ. Death is not easy to grasp, but the Gospel provides a handrail for us to hold on to. When believers die, they don’t go to hell or purgatory to pay for their sins– Christ paid for their sins already! Rather, they obtain their glorified body. In the death of a believer, sin’s last finger tip slips off of the person. No longer are they affected by the fall. There’s no more weeping, heartache, sickness, or decay. There’s only joyous praise in the realization and collection of their promised reward– Jesus! 
If you are grieving the loss of someone close to you, and they believed in Christ, rest assured in the words of Paul “God, who gives us the victory through Christ”. Christ has obtained the Salvation of all those that the Father commands, and the Spirit seals all those that Jesus purchased redemption for. There is hope, a sweet and joyous hope, and His name is Jesus!

A Mental Buffet // 8 June 2017

Mental Buffet

 

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

Reformed Theology Gone Sour: A Warning – Ray Ortlund

“If we stop with the intellectual, if we allow our theology to remain cerebral and conceptual only, then this coldness, hardness, harshness and ruthlessness will enter in. And we will not even realize it, because our theology is objectively right and personally satisfying.”

 

Listening to God Without Getting All Weird About It – Stephen Altrogge

“God’s guidance is going to come to you in the mundanity of life. He is sovereign over all things. All things are being worked according to the counsel of His will and the salvation of His people (Ephesians 1, Romans 8). You can trust that your circumstances are not an accident right now.”

 

Beware the Fearmonger – Wade Johnston

“The fearmonger lives off fear, though. He or she needs a reason to exist, to be an authority, to write or speak or do whatever, and fear gives him or her that. Sometimes the fearmonger latches on to a real threat and twists it. Sometimes the fearmonger plays up the unfamiliar or unexpected. Often the fearmonger simply pulls something out of a hat, throwing together labels that bring out deep-set prejudices or worries, seizing upon superficial correlations to allege causation (a trusty old trick even if it’s a wholly irresponsible way to study history of any sort or intellectual development). And in his or her quest, the fearmonger is willing to cause division, to sacrifice the reputations of anyone but himself or herself (sometimes thinking he or she is doing so as a servant of the truth, or of the right side of history, or of God or gods or whatever he or she fancies or holds in reverence). In the process, too, it’s amazing how often the fearmonger’s ideology’s or theology’s or politics’ or god’s antagonists align with those of whom they are personally jealous or distrustful or the people they just generally don’t like and haven’t liked for some time, whether they’ll admit it or not.”

A “Yuuuge” Mental Buffet

Mental Buffet

 

I’ve been slacking off on the mental buffets so I decided to make up for it with this one…

 

Is My Repentance Enough? – Chad West

“Every choice I make affects me and those around me. The physical consequences of my actions might well echo down the hall of the rest of my life. Worse, it’s an affront to God. But our imperfect repentance doesn’t keep the gift of God’s love from washing us clean. His forgiveness isn’t based on how perfectly we get the grammar, or how well dressed we are when we present it to our Father. Forgiveness is based on the finished work of Jesus, not how well we repent.
Of course I’m not saying to half-do it. But I don’t think I’m talking to people who want to half-do it. I’m talking to people who are sincerely sorry for their sins—so sorry they can’t imagine their screw-ups can be made right.”

 

Discovering Liturgy – Heidi Johnston

“Not only does this intentional practice train you heart towards thankfulness, it also teaches you to see differently. I am beginning to realise how much discipline it takes to cultivate a moment by moment awareness of God’s presence in all things and I am grateful for the new place good liturgy has come to play in this ongoing battle.”

 

It’s Gospel Law the Way Down – JDK

“You see, the distinction between law and gospel is not related to grammar, semantics, or even theology, but power: the gospel silences the accusation, curse, and demand of the law. Now, this is not, as some will be quick to say, the (impossible) heresy of anti-nomianism, as if we could somehow will away the demand of the law, or simply be freed from it’s accusation. It is, instead, when G-D becomes Father, when Moses and Elijah disappear and only Jesus remains, when this “true saying that is worthy for all people to receive, that Christ Jesus came to save sinners,” is heard, then he/she is one whom the Son has set free, and is free indeed (Jn 8:36).”

 

Keep Christianity Weird – Joshua Kinlaw

“Christianity’s sheer familiarity has desensitized us to its radicalness. Hurtado aims to show how the “odd” became “commonplace,” by surveying the first three centuries of the Jesus movement. In fact the very concept of a book can be traced to early Jesus followers. The “bookishness” of the movement is one of the “distinctives” Hurtado describes, which helped make a ragtag group of Jewish schismatics into a global institution. It also offered a radically new way of thinking about three things: identity, religion, and morality.”

 

Protestant Priestcraft – Douglas Wilson

“But know this—wine for the world is not the same thing as wine for the priest only. Bread for the world is the grace of God that challenges priestcraft everywhere—whether those “priests” are Protestant or Catholic.”

 

Education, Gospel, and Freedom – Rod Rosenbladt

“In this short lecture, Dr. Rosenbladt tackles modern education and how it has transitioned from what educational institutions were originally established to do in early American history to the institutions that they are today, and how that relates to basic Christian doctrine and individual liberty.

This lecture was presented on Monday, October 2015 as the first of Concordia University Irvine’s CUI Bono lecture series for the academic year.”

 

Why do we gather for corporate worship? Five essential reasons – Brian Croft

“When a congregation collectively sits under the preached Word, a level of accountability is established and nourished among the hearers to urge each other to go and apply that sermon. A greater obligation to “do something” with the Word preached and to rely on one another for help and strength to obey it exists in this kind of community life that is not present when we listen in isolation or hop churches depending upon who is preaching that week.”