Casualties of Numb

When we first invaded Iraq, I would go outside every morning to grab the paper waiting to see a “War Ends in Middle East” Headline plastered across the Texarkana Gazette. I can’t for the life of me tell you why I did this. Maybe it was because I wanted to be the first to know we won. Perhaps I just hoped it’d be a quick little war.

Sometimes, my dad would beat me outside in our race to the driveway, and be sitting in his recliner reading the paper. In these situations I’d ask the same question: “Did we win the war yet?” Eventually he ended my continuous inquiry with a loving statement, “Buddy, when we’re done fighting in the Middle East, I promise I’ll let you know.”

He’s never told me this yet.

We have been fighting for sixteen years. I have known us to be in war more than at peace. And I am weary. But I remember a time when we weren’t at war. When fighting was not our default position. When attacks were wept over; not celebrated.

Seniors, graduating and going to Prom this year, do not remember a time we haven’t been at war. They’ve spent an entire lifetime with us fighting. And last Thursday we took a large leap forward to sending young men and women back out again. You could say this was a one time thing. That’s not the stance we’re taking in Afghanistan and North Korea. Our actions and your ideas are inconsistent.

I cannot join the celebration of force without weeping for our casualties. Not just soldiers but for the loss of ourselves. The loss of innocence. We used to be so sensitive to war. If we went to war, we all mourned that it had come to that. The loss of one soldiers life was a shock to us all.

Now we are numb. We are the spiritual and emotional tooth that’s been infected too long by the War Cavity. Numb to the fact that people are dying and we celebrate their deaths. Numb to the fact that we want the violence and the bloodshed. Numb that we call those innocent civilians who we kill as “collateral damage”; the cost of doing business. We’re too dosed up on Novacaine to feel pain anymore.

But what will I tell my sons, when they come up to me as I sit in my chair and read the paper? When they ask me “is the war over yet?” Will I tell them that I’ll let them know when the fightings over? Will I tell them that they shouldn’t fear or weep over the loss of a generation’s innocence? What will I tell them?

I will tell them that this too will be made right. That one day, we will beat our plowshares into pruning hooks. One day, I will see that yes, everything sad does become untrue.

And maybe, just maybe, my children will return back to the time before the war.

Gospel Assurance and Kingdom Citizens

Phil 1:18b-30

One of the things I find most frustrating about the human condition is that I cannot know everything. We often hear advertisements along the lines of “build for your future” “save for tomorrow” “what will you’re life look like in 20 years?” We do everything in our power to navigate life, prepared for any kind of emergency. We, like squirrels, gather our acorns up, preparing for the long Winter of Life, when the winds blow cold and the dark comes too soon. But, as we heard last week, in a moment, that can all change. This boss comes in and says, “You’re on the hot seat”, the doctor says, “It’s worse than we thought”, you find out children just aren’t in your future, the debt collector calls again and again, as if you don’t have a family you’re trying to take care of. We try to navigate life, but the Unknown hovers, like a phantom. And many of us may be tempted to wake up each day in fear. “Is this the day when it all falls apart.” And we don’t know. We can’t know what waits us.

Growing up, I remember times when I would wait in absolute anguish knowing that I was going to get in trouble when my parents came home. Kids, maybe you know the anguish of Report Card day. The first time I brought home a C on my report card, was the longest 35 minute bus ride of my life. Because I knew, the “strongly worded conversation of love at loud volumes” was coming. The spanking was coming. The grounding was coming.

We find Paul in a very similar but higher stakes situation. You’ll remember that he is under arrest, having appealed to Caesar for his freedom. He is waiting, knowing that he very well could die. The Romans could come at any minute and haul him away. This is life or death. He may not get out of this one. But as we also saw a glimpse of last week, Paul seems to not be troubled by this. He is using language like “I will rejoice”. At first glance perhaps you’re like me, thinking “Rejoice Paul? You’re going to rejoice? There? On possible death row?”

And so this draws us to the very first question: What is Paul rejoicing in?

Paul rejoices because, while he may be uncertain about what conclusion Caesar will come to, he is absolutely positive that the result is the same. He says in verses 19-20, “this will work out for my deliverance, it is my eager expectation and hope that I will not be ashamed”. Paul is confident in one thing. He is united to Christ. Paul is fixated, hooked, and grounded on the promise that he is already justified before God, and thus will be resurrected and made like Him. He knows in Whom he has believed. He knows that he belongs to His faithful Savior, Jesus Christ. Paul is resting on the promise “He who began a good work in you will complete it.” When Paul says “this will work out for my deliverance,” he uses the same root word we use for salvation. Paul is rejoicing in the assurance he has in the Gospel. Christ has come, lived, and died in the place of His people, he was resurrected and ascended. Paul is rejoicing in that, because by faith in Christ, Paul also will be resurrected. Regardless of what the Romans can do to Paul today, tomorrow Paul will be with Christ. This is the root of the great statement in our Text this morning, “to live is Christ, to die is gain.”

The great temptation this morning is for you to hear that great statement of faith and say “Oh I wish I could be more like Paul. I wish I could have the great faith he had.” My plea with you this morning is that you don’t look to Paul as a model of faith, but rather look to the object of Paul’s faith, Jesus Christ. You have this same promise, by faith. No other place will give us such hope. No other place promises deliverance. This is the only place where we can find real Gospel assurance.

So what does this mean? We can say all day, I have assurance that I am in Christ. But so what? What should be the result of that assurance?

I believe Gospel assurance frees us to glorify God, and calls us to live as Kingdom Citizens.

First, our assurance frees us to glorify God.

Paul is saying very plainly that his highest goal, the height of his desire, is that God is honored in his body, or another way to say that is “glorified”. But then Paul clarifies his statement and says that God will be glorified in either his life or his death. And this seems odd, because Paul’s in jail. He has no life. He can’t do anything. This can’t be a place where Paul can glorify God. But it certainly is. Casesar may look to control the Gospel, to thwart Paul’s ministry. But that’s not the case for Paul. In this cell he is the freest man in Rome. Paul knows God has not brought him here only to abandon Paul. Paul could have very well looked at his cell, the guard chained to him, thrown up his hands and said, “Well I can’t reach anyone here. This isn’t where I’m supposed to be.” But that’s not his reaction, and it shouldn’t be ours. When we see that Christ is not going to let us go, not going to abandon us, it removes all fear that we’re not where God wants us to be.

Growing up in the 2000s, that was the main statement I would hear at youth camp or events: You need to figure out what is God’s will for your life. What is your purpose? And it wasn’t intentional, but what that creates is this overwhelming anxiety, “What am I supposed to do? What do you want from me?” And if we’re honest, we often translate that as if we have to throw everything to the wind, and charge the gates of hell. That we’re the ones that have to go and do big things. That we have to fight all the fights. And it presses down on us, like a weight, to crush us. Some of us are called to church planting or ministry. Some of us are called to work in the ghettoes or in the mission fields far away.

But what if that’s not you? What if you’re gifting is that you entertain other families well? What if you’re really good with numbers? Maybe you just really care for children, or you’re administrative skills are awesome. Or let’s step away from the church. Maybe you’re just a good worker. Perhaps you’re just a student, a banker, a doctor, professor, administrator, or businessperson. Because we know, God has redeemed us and gifted us for Himself, we can rest in these things. We can trust that God is glorified in our being faithful sons or daughters, husbands or wives, brothers or sisters, children and friends. You don’t have to be a zealot, or all in, or sold out. Just be ordinary. Just be where you are.

[9] Now concerning brotherly love you have no need for anyone to write to you, for you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another, [10] for that indeed is what you are doing to all the brothers throughout Macedonia. But we urge you, brothers, to do this more and more, [11] and to aspire to live quietly, and to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we instructed you, [12] so that you may walk properly before outsiders and be dependent on no one.

(1 Thessalonians 4:9-12 ESV)

This is what Paul means when he says “to live is Christ”. It is a statement, a confession, that “Christ will be glorified in my body. If that’s as minister, a housewife, a salesperson, or a faithful child, my life will be marked by a dependence only on Christ and the grace he brings.”

But assurance also frees us to glorify God in our death. For Paul this looked like being courageous when threatened with execution. For us, where the likelihood of dying for the Gospel seems so distant, it’s hard for us to relate to this. But not being able to relate to something doesn’t mean we shouldn’t affirm that it exists for them. That our brothers and sisters worshipped as we slept this morning and risked their lives for the Gospel. We have heard stories of churches being ripped apart by totalitarian governments, missionaries being killed in the field by those whom they loved enough to bring the Gospel to them. We should recognize and pray for the persecuted Church.

For us, where persecution is so foreign, how then can we glorify God in our death? One way is to have an appropriate view of death, one in which we don’t fear it. Paul was so confident in His union with Christ; that at the threat of death is seen as gain. If you keep Paul alive in prison, strip him of everything, he’s going to preach the Gospel to everyone near him, soldier, citizen, whoever. If you kill Paul, his mindset is, “Well then I will be with Jesus.” Dear Christian, this should be a delight to you. I said earlier about how life could change in an instant. And those tragedies can create doubt. Doubt that God cares for us, doubt that we’ll survive. Where will we find our comfort? Our only comfort in life and death is that we are not our own, but belong to Jesus Christ. Not a hair can fall without the will of your Heavenly Father. But if when die, Christian, you will only take your first breath in eternity.

Death is dead. This is why Paul calls it gain. But if you are here this morning, and you do not look to Christ, ut rather something else for your joy, I must ask you this question. Will that thing, whatever it is you cling to; will it sustain you this way? All other things can be taken away. Your job can be gone. Your money can be stolen. Only in Christ are you assured of your fate, even in the face of Death.

Christ has died, and was raised, for you. This truth is freeing. Because I know that I now, and in eternity will stand before God, not according to my righteousness, but Christ’s, I am free to glorify Him in my life.  You do not have to wander in the forest of doubt. You do not have to live in fear that God is not made much of in you.

Second, Gospel assurance calls us to live as Citizens of the Kingdom of God.

Here we come to this part of the text, and after hearing all of that Gospel, all the freedom that we have, now it sounds like Paul is looking at the Philippians and saying, “Earn it”. That’s not what’s going on here. When we begin to look at this phrase, it literally means, “live as citizens of the Gospel.” Paul is taking something that is common among all of them, and elevating it. He is aiming right at the heart of their identity and saying, “Oh this is much better”.

Here’s what I mean. To be Philippian was to be among the most patriotic people of that time. Philipi was granted a unique status in the empire. It was modeld to be a Little Rome.  Philippi, though in Greece, spoke Latin. They had automatic Roman citizenship from birth. Many who called it home were former soldiers. They were as Roman as gladiator fights and chariot races. They took immense amount of pride in being from Philippi.

But Paul is calling them to live as citizens of a much better city than Philippi, a better Kingdom than Rome. Because this Kingdom transcends all Earthly allegiance. In this dense, political season we find ourselves, we often are assaulted with an appeal to our citizenship. “Be sure to do your ‘civic duty’”. But we are also called to a Kingdom duty to one another, and it is of much greater importance.

So how do we live as citizens of the Kingdom? There are many ways, but Paul gives us two here that we should pay close attention to this morning.

First, we strive together in unity. He writes “If I come at see you or if I’m absent, I may hear” that they are living in light of the Gospel. This is important for them, because the time could be soon that Paul could not be around anymore. He could be gone, and the Philippians have to have a better unifier than just being Paul’s fruitful harvest in Macedonia

Paul is saying very plainly, if I come to you or if I don’t, what’s most important for you is that you live life this way. Paul is intimately tied to this church. He is its planter; preaching the Gospel to Lydia, baptizing her and her house. Freeing the demonic girl. Preaching the Gospel to the jailer, baptizing him and his house. There’s roots with Paul. But healthy churches are united by more than their planter. They live decades longer, because they’re united, not by a man and his vision. But by the Gospel he proclaims.  We have to be untied in Christ and by the Gospel he proclaims.

And this is hard because we don’t naturally pull towards one another. There are so many things that we can use to separate ourselves from each other. In this highly polar political season, we are tempted to let our own ideologies and our own party put blinders on us and ask “how can they over there on the other side even say they love Jesus.” We debate things and are divided by that even at the end of the day aren’t important. Some of us care more about social justice and racial reconciliation, some of us care more about taxation and economics, and that’s ok. Some of us homeschool, some us public, and that’s ok. Some of us extroverts, some of us introverts, and that’s ok. We are tied together by something so much better, so much bigger than that.

Paul also says that we are to strive together. This carries with it an idea of soldiers standing side by side and fighting together. We are called to share the fights, the burdens with those around us. To care for one another. To help each other anyway we can. But the only way we can do this is by being in each other’s lives. This is an area where I personally have failed. If we are going to stand together and strive together, then we have to fellowship together. Spend time together. Care for another.

There was a professor who went to the hospital and found out he had only a few months left to live. Lying in his bed one day, he heard singing hymns outside his window. He went to it and saw his students, perhaps 100 of them, serenading him in his final hours. He said, “I didn’t feel alone” The worst place we could be is alone. That is my greatest fear. To be in a vulnerable place alone.  We need each other, and to live as united citizens is to look at one another, knowing these issues exist and saying, “Brother, sister, how may I encourage you with the Gospel?”

Second, live as citizens by facing opposition boldly. Paul says that we are “not to fear our opponents”. We admitted earlier that, while persecution is not the common threat to the Church in America, there still remains pressure to walk away. We are assaulted with the call from those around us to return. To defect and repatriate ourselves back to a dying City. A coworker may throw you under the bus just so that they can get ahead, and we are tempted to get revenge against them. Our culture tells us that truth is relative, morality subjective; and tells the Church that if we don’t support this notion, that we will lose our influence and attractiveness. On the other hand we are warned by some that we could lose our freedoms and rights to worship, that they are the only ones who can help us. But we need not worry about our attractiveness nor our rights. Both ends of this City of Man call out for us to join them and to come find our peace in citizenship with them. But this City is crumbling; our Kingdom cannot be shaken.

We will suffer in this life. It may be through our family, or our finances, or our health. Suffering will come. That is one of the few things you can rest assured of. But a far greater assurance you have is this. Christ has died on behalf of His enemies. And those same enemies may, by faith in Him, be made right with God and brought in as citizens of a Great Kingdom, glorifying their God and enjoying him in life, in death, and forever.

A Mental Buffet //9 Mar 2017

mental-buffet

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

How Flocks Are Protected – Douglas Wilson

“Shepherds need, in Paul’s terms, to “take heed.” They need to take head to themselves, and they need to take heed to the flock. A man who is not taking heed to himself cannot watch out for the flock. And if a man is not watching out for the flock, then he is clearly not taking heed to himself—he is guilty of a gross dereliction of duty.”

 

Throw Like a Girl: Why Feminism Insults Real Women – Rebekah Merkle

“The idea that women are equal to men is not a feminist idea; it’s a Christian idea. The apostle Paul said it long before Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Gloria Steinem when he taught us that in Christ there is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female (Galatians 3:28). And he said it nearly two millennia before the women’s rights people came along.

The feminists try to take credit for something that is the fruit of the gospel, working its way into culture like yeast through a loaf. We need to stop letting the feminists act as if they somehow achieved our equality.”

 

Why I Am a Continuationist – Sam Storms

“If signs and wonders were designed exclusively to authenticate apostles, we have no explanation why non-apostolic believers (such as Philip and Stephen) were empowered to perform them (see especially 1 Cor. 12:8-10, where the “gift” of “miracles,” among others, was given to average, non-apostolic believers).”

 

Evolution and the Historical Fall: What Does Genesis 3 Tell Us about the Origin of Evil? – J. Richard Middleton

“…the narrative of disobedience in Genesis 3 is not simply about a single event in the past (though that is not thereby excluded), but describes what is typical in the process of temptation and sin in human experience. Indeed, when preachers expound the Garden story they tend to emphasize how this is true for all of us, rather than locating it in a singular event long ago.

Once we are open to viewing the Garden narrative in this manner, the dialogue between the woman and the snake in Genesis can be seen as a profound study in the phenomenology of temptation and sin, which may be applied not only to our own present experience of temptation, but also to the experience of early Homo sapiens.”

Suicide & The Christian

the-new-you

I wanted to make this post because Christians have real questions about serious issues like suicide and sometimes the answers given aren’t always clear or Scripturally sound so I want to provide you with a couple of short videos and an excerpt from Luther’s Table Talks that hopefully answers the question of what happens to a Christian if they should commit suicide and whether or not suicide was a sin that Jesus died to forgive. (Here’s a spoiler: Yes, Jesus died to forgive all sin including suicide.)

In one of his “Table Talks,” Martin Luther himself commented: “I don’t have the opinion that suicides are certainly to be damned. My reason is that they do not wish to kill themselves but are overcome by the power of the devil.” Luther goes on, however, to express concern that this statement not be misunderstood or misused in a way that would downplay the danger and seriousness of this sin in the minds of people (Luther’s Works, American Edition, Vol. 54, p. 29).

Should I Be ‘Baptized’ or ‘Filled’ With The Spirit?: A Theological Examination of a Divisive New Testament Doctrine

“The Baptism of the Holy Spirit is a divinely unique outpouring of the Holy Spirit, however, contrary to popular Pentecostal theology, it has ceased.

[Let me preface this post with a disclaimer that the views expressed below are my own and do not represent the views of Late Night Theology’s other authors.]

 

Is there a difference between the Baptism of the Holy Spirit and the Filling of the Holy Spirit? The simple answer is yes. The much more elaborate and theological answer is what I’m laboring in this post to explain.

Baptism of the Spirit: What it is, isn’t and when it occurred

The Baptism of the Holy Spirit is a divinely unique outpouring of the Holy Spirit. It is when God fills a person with the Spirit and the person begins to speak in other tongues. However, contrary to popular Pentecostal theology, it has ceased. It stopped being. It is no more. In John 20:22 Jesus breathes on the disciples and tells them to “receive the Holy Spirit”. This, I believe to be prophetic of Pentecost.

At Pentecost the believers received the Holy Spirit. What does “receive” indicate? That they did not already have the Spirit. Now, you might say “But every believer has the Spirit today!” and you would be right, you just proved my point! The Baptism of the Holy Spirit ceased sometime during the writing of the NT because in Ephesians 5 Paul commands us to be filled with the Holy Spirit (we’ll handle this in a few minutes).

Why is this distinction important? Because baptism happens once, but a filling happens repeatedly. Take Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 12:13, which was written around AD 53-55, “For in one πνεῦμα (Spirit) we were all βαπτίζω (baptized) into one body… and all were made to drink of one πνεῦμα (Spirit)” [Emphasis mine].

The key to understanding this position is to understand that believers pre-Pentecost did not have the Holy Spirit. We see this in passages like Acts 19 where Paul is at Ephesus (the same church to whom he would pen the Epistle to the Ephesians) and he comes across a group of disciples. He asks them if they had yet received the Holy Spirit (19:2), to which they responded “No, we have not even heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” Quite odd, right? You see, John’s baptism wasn’t the same baptism that Jesus commanded us to do in Matthew 28. It was a baptism of repentance (19:4) so Paul baptized them in the name of Jesus and that is when they received the Spirit (19:5).

Now, one might note that these disciples, along with the many at Pentecost, all spoke in tongues. My brothers and sisters in the Pentecostal denominations see this as evidence that tongues should then follow this baptism of the Spirt. However, I would like you to remember that these people did not have the Spirit to begin with. You’ll remember that Pentecost happened after the ascension of Christ, and this is by no coincidence. In order for the Spirit to come Jesus had to leave. So the Baptism of the Spirit was the way in which God poured out His Spirit on the first believers who took the Gospel and began doing the Great Commission (which included baptizing in the Trinitarian form).

 

Filling with the Spirit: What it is, isn’t and when it happens

Since I have (hopefully) persuaded you from Scripture that the disciples and early believers did not have the Holy Spirit because Christ was yet to ascend and make way for the Spirit, I want us now to look at the filling of the Spirit. I said earlier that baptism happens once but a filling happens multiple times. Our primary text for examination will be Ephesians 5:15-21.

The context of this verse is that of a holy life of walking in love. In verse 18 Paul gives us very unique contrast:

Con   Pro
Do not get drunk with wine But Be filled with the Spirit
μὴ μεθύσκεσθε οἴνῳ   μὴ μεθύσκεσθε οἴνῳ
Lit: Never be drunk with wine   Lit: Nevertheless, be filled to the brim with the Holy Spirit

 

Often times the baptism of the Spirit is equated with the ability to live a holy life. I believe this is simply a misunderstanding of terms. You no doubt struggle with sin, as I do, on a daily basis. I daily need to be filled with the Holy Spirit in order to overcome the temptations that I face. So rightly Paul drew a connection between being drunk (i.e. being controlled by alcohol) to being filled with the Spirit (i.e. controlled by the Spirit).

This filling is repetitive, it happens more than once. It is something every believer should seek because they already have the Spirit living inside of them. It does enable one to fight against sin, and it does cause one to live a more holy life.

The question is then: “why, if I already have the Spirit, do I need to be baptized in and then filled with the Spirit?” And the answer is, you don’t have to be baptized and filled. You already have the Spirit, but you have access to more of the Spirit. You have access granted to you for you to grow closer to God your Savior. The commandment is to be filled with the Spirit.

Conclusion

In conclusion I want to reiterate what I have already said and hopefully drive home the winning run, so to speak. John baptized with a baptism of repentance, this is what the early disciples had been baptized into while Jesus was still present. Jesus ascended, thus making a way for the Holy Spirit to come as He had prophesied in John 20:22. In Acts 2 on the Day of Pentecost God poured out His Spirit on the believers (who did not already have the Holy Spirit), thus baptizing them in the Spirit. After that they were commissioned to do what Jesus had commanded them to do in the Great Commission, namely to make disciples and to baptize them in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

After the Gospel began to spread and disciples were being made by the dozens, we transition from God pouring out His Spirit on to people who had not yet heard of nor received the Spirit, to God filling Spirit-dwelt believers with more of His Spirit so that they could walk closer to Him and could be bold witness for Him.

I hope that after reading this you are encouraged and challenged. If you are like I was and are curious about what all the fuss is about, I hope that this cleared it up! I hope that now you can see the distinction between the two often confused terms. I also hope that you see that Acts is not so much prescriptive as it is descriptive. In the end, no matter if you side with me, or you side with the brothers and sisters in the Pentecostal tribe, I hope that this is a conversation that we can have for many years to come without letting it hinder our Gospel influence in the world.

Why You Should Consider A House Church

We live in a day and age where (especially in America) people work more than forty hours just to make ends meet. Then on top of that their kids play sports, or are part of various clubs and societies. Parents come home, turn the tv on and desperately try to zone out and escape reality. Then, on the weekends they get together with friends and family. The kids play together while the adults bemoan about having to go to church tomorrow. I’ve heard it for years while working in a “secular” job—“I don’t have time for church on Sunday, I just want to rest” (ignoring the fact that 3 out of 4 times Saturday was spent with friends and family doing something that was physically exhausting and thus not resting). So as someone who loves the church, I can’t help but lament at the weight the American church has added to the family. “Join a small group!” “Come out and serve!” “Invite your friends (who are really just as beat and weary as you and likely wont come either)!” And I know churches mean well, and that the program system once worked but, frankly, now it doesn’t.

I say all of that to say this: we need something different. Something natural, organic. Something that alleviates families from the burdensome weight of going to church and gives them the freedom found in the Gospel to be the church. Thus, I am highly favorable of the house church. Below are the pros and cons that I see in the house church model.

Pros

  1. Money is not an obstacle. It’s no secret that planting a church costs money. It is also no secret that ministry often times does not provide substantial amounts of money. But with a house church all the incoming money can go straight to missions—local and otherwise. The house church is able to actually help those in need, and not just direct them to another ministry for assistance.
  2. You meet where people are most comfortable (and open): I personally love having people over to hang out! Even as an introvert, it is some of the most fun that I have. People generally are more comfortable and open to going to someone’s house over and against going to a church building. If we’re completely honest with ourselves, it is really awkward to invite others to church. And most of the time it’s a failed attempt.
  3. Hospitality drives the movement: In order for the house church movement to thrive, the people must be hospitable. You aren’t just gathering together with other believers, but with unbelievers and skeptics who are taking a huge step by coming over to a stranger’s home with a bunch of Christians. If people aren’t hospitable, especially the host family, then the chances of being able to speak Gospel life into the lives of unbelievers become all but null and void.
  4. Teaching is more practical and life-giving: Ideally the teaching becomes less structured (i.e. the meeting is less formal and bound to a schedule) and more organic. As people share about their week and the struggles they’ve faced each person has the opportunity to share Biblical truths with others and that in turn leads into the teaching time. The Gospel becomes incredibly freeing when it is taught in a way that speaks directly to the daily life of a believer and not in a lecture-style sermon.
  5. Believers are encouraged to bear the burdens of others: Galatians 6:2 is a clear command to believers to come beside other believers and walk with them in times of trial. It’s not uncommon for people to join a larger church because they can get lost in the crowd. In a house church, because of its small size, it is imperative for everyone to bear the weight of the daily battle with sin.
  6. Neighborhoods are changed from the inside: It’s not uncommon to hear a pastor say “we have a heart for (insert city name)” and while that is a good goal, it’s a rather large goal. The house church says “we have a heart for our neighbors”, which is a more manageable goal. By changing our own neighborhood, we take steps to changing the city as a whole.
  7. It is elder-led and deacon-served, by nature: Servant leadership comes a lot more naturally in a house church. Elders are able to pastor the flock with more precision and diligence because the flock is a lot smaller. Deacons are also able to serve more easily. This is especially true if the house church is specifically focusing on their neighborhood alone. In that case, ministry by the deacons and elders are able to make visits to the sick and hurting in a quick manner because they are literally living among their sheep.
  8. Spiritual gifts can more be more freely expressed: Obviously Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians about operating orderly when it comes to the gifts is still to be adhered to. However, unlike in a traditional church service where there is a time limit for the service, in a house church believers are free to use their gifts in a more natural manner rather than a in a set time frame. For instance, perhaps someone has a word of knowledge, it is not nearly as distracting to speak this word in a house church setting as it would be to stand up and interrupt the pastor in a traditional church setting.
  9. Evangelism becomes more personal: Instead of the pastor giving a blanket offering of salvation, everybody is encouraged to share the Gospel in one way or another with any unbeliever that is present. Further more, nonbelievers are exposed to the Gospel through real-life situations, and not necessarily through a time of teaching when the invitation to repent is a footnote.

Cons

  1. It’s not “traditional”: It’s not traditional, which means its not going to be highly looked upon as a legitimate church. If you do choose to pursue this model, I would warn you of the probable “but that’s just a Bible study, not a real church” comment.
  2. You won’t become super popular: House churches are by nature a small setting. So while you wont become popular, you will be able to pastor more specifically. Your church won’t grow to a large number, and unless the house churches in the house church network decide to come together periodically for a larger meeting, you won’t be standing in front of a large crowd of people, but rather sitting among the sheep you faithfully pastor.
  3. You won’t reach a lot of people (quickly): Every pastor wants to reach a lot of people and to do that you have to invite a lot of people in. But with the house church you simply can’t do that. And I argue that this is actually a good thing. Obviously you still want to reach people, but you do so by training up other elders to host a congregation in their own home and when they do you joyfully give them some of your flock so that there is more room for new people. So while in the first three years of ministry you might not see a growth from 50 people to 300, you might see 6 elders raised up and sent out and that is a much healthier approach to discipleship.
  4. You will likely be bi-vo: While it is possible to be a full-time house church pastor, it probably isn’t the most practical plan. But again, this is good! Being bi-vocational allows you to have genuine friendships with people you meet everyday at work. Instead of being able to disengage from the culture around you, you are forced to be a part of it and to utilize it for the glory of God!

A lot more could be said in favor of this, like discipleship, discipline and communion but for brevity sake I’ll save that for a later post! However, I am becoming a more strong proponent of the house church model every day. I really believe it is one of the healthiest models. I have included a list of practical resources I have personally benefitted from as I have studied this model.

Resources for further study

  1. The House Church Book (Wolfgang Simpson)
  2. Everyday Church (Steve Timmis & Tim Chester)
  3. Total Church (Steve Timmis & Tim Chester)
  4. Housechurch.org
  5. Thecrowdedhouse.org
  6. Christfellowshipkc.org

Late Night Theology, Episode 5: Come to the Dork Side… We Have Jarritos

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In this episode, Logan and Tom talk about Star Wars, Monks, New Heavens and New Earth, and more! Logan goes on a couple of rants and Tom gives some Rogue One spoilers. You don’t want to miss it!

Links//
Heaven, Hell, and the End of the World – David Platt

A Year with God – Richard Foster and Julia Roller

Morning and Evening – Charles Spurgeon

The Life with God Bible

Late Night Theology Audio Archive

T. Austin-Sparks

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