A Mental Buffet // 13 Apr 2017

Mental Buffet

[This was supposed to go up yesterday, but you know… stuff happens… deal with it.]

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

Here’s how you can match your Myers-Briggs personality type to a patron saint

“Church of the Resurrection, an Anglican Church in Wheaton, Ill., has created the following graphic to illustrate how the different personalities of patron saints correspond with Myers-Briggs personality types. Are you St. Francis or perhaps St. Joan (of Arc)? Check it out.”

 

Steve Brown, Etc. – Outside the Camp with Garth Cross

“Join Garth Cross on Steve Brown, Etc. for a discussion of his book, Outside the Camp: A Former Pastor Looks at the Church from a Distance. Hear the laments of sin and shame, broken community, and people in pain. Then listen as God responds with his radical grace.”

 

5 Reasons I’m a Calvinist – Stephen Altrogge

“Calvinism doesn’t have a fantastic reputation, at least in some circles. Some people feel like it focuses more on theology than on loving people. Others have had really bad experiences with Calvinists. And some people think it runs counter to the beautiful free offer of grace found in the Bible.

But what if someone who is not a jerk (at least most of the time) could talk about Calvinism in a way that didn’t make you want to smash your computer?”

 

 

Casualties of Numb

When we first invaded Iraq, I would go outside every morning to grab the paper waiting to see a “War Ends in Middle East” Headline plastered across the Texarkana Gazette. I can’t for the life of me tell you why I did this. Maybe it was because I wanted to be the first to know we won. Perhaps I just hoped it’d be a quick little war.

Sometimes, my dad would beat me outside in our race to the driveway, and be sitting in his recliner reading the paper. In these situations I’d ask the same question: “Did we win the war yet?” Eventually he ended my continuous inquiry with a loving statement, “Buddy, when we’re done fighting in the Middle East, I promise I’ll let you know.”

He’s never told me this yet.

We have been fighting for sixteen years. I have known us to be in war more than at peace. And I am weary. But I remember a time when we weren’t at war. When fighting was not our default position. When attacks were wept over; not celebrated.

Seniors, graduating and going to Prom this year, do not remember a time we haven’t been at war. They’ve spent an entire lifetime with us fighting. And last Thursday we took a large leap forward to sending young men and women back out again. You could say this was a one time thing. That’s not the stance we’re taking in Afghanistan and North Korea. Our actions and your ideas are inconsistent.

I cannot join the celebration of force without weeping for our casualties. Not just soldiers but for the loss of ourselves. The loss of innocence. We used to be so sensitive to war. If we went to war, we all mourned that it had come to that. The loss of one soldiers life was a shock to us all.

Now we are numb. We are the spiritual and emotional tooth that’s been infected too long by the War Cavity. Numb to the fact that people are dying and we celebrate their deaths. Numb to the fact that we want the violence and the bloodshed. Numb that we call those innocent civilians who we kill as “collateral damage”; the cost of doing business. We’re too dosed up on Novacaine to feel pain anymore.

But what will I tell my sons, when they come up to me as I sit in my chair and read the paper? When they ask me “is the war over yet?” Will I tell them that I’ll let them know when the fightings over? Will I tell them that they shouldn’t fear or weep over the loss of a generation’s innocence? What will I tell them?

I will tell them that this too will be made right. That one day, we will beat our plowshares into pruning hooks. One day, I will see that yes, everything sad does become untrue.

And maybe, just maybe, my children will return back to the time before the war.

The Gospel for Cynics, Doubters, and Skeptics

GospelForCynics

The next day Jesus decided to go to Galilee. He found Philip and said to him, “Follow me.” Now Philip was from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter. Philip found Nathanael and said to him, “We have found him about whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus son of Joseph from Nazareth.” Nathanael said to him, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip said to him, “Come and see.” When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.” – John 1:43-51, NRSV

I’m going to have the privilege of teaching over this passage in Bible Study at my church in a couple of weeks and the more I read this passage, the more I can’t help but think about the different personalities that come into play here.

Philip

In the passage, Philip is mentioned first. Jesus said, “Follow me” and that’s exactly what Philip did. Philip followed him without question or hesitation. Now, what does Philip do? He finds Nathanael, and he tells him that they’ve found the Messiah. We’ll touch on Nathanael’s response in a bit, but notice Philip. He seems enthusiastic about telling people about the Messiah. This same enthusiasm is a common personality trait of his. It’s why he’s able to be an effective witness to the Gospel of Christ.

In Acts 8, he witnesses to and baptizes a eunuch and in Acts 21:8 he is given the title of ‘Evangelist.’   I think it’s fair to deduce from what little the New Testament has to say about Philip that he is someone who is optimistic, and he’s someone that we might refer to as a ‘go getter.’

Personally, I can’t relate.

However, pay attention to what Philip says when Nathanael tries to argue with him – “come and see.” I think modern Christendom can learn a thing or two simply pausing and reflecting on this passage. Philip doesn’t try to argue with Nathanael, he just says, “Come and see.” He’s saying, “Alright, find out for yourself.”

You see ads all the time that have money-back guarantees and they say, “If you’re not completely satisfied with the product then send it back and you’ll get your money back.” Now, we know that’s not entirely true. Before you’re able to get your money back, there’s a lot of bureaucratic red tape that you have to go through, but what Philip says to Nathanael is better than a money-back guarantee. He simply says, “Come and see.”

Honestly, I think that’s the most effective way to evangelize. You not see a boost in church attendance by evangelizing like that, but that’s because we’ve defined success by the numbers, but that’s another blog post for another time.

Nathanael

I can relate to Nathanael. Notice his response to Philip – “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Why would Nathanael say this? I would say that Nathanael is being realistic.

As we’ll see later, Nathanael is a student of Old Testament. There’s not anything mentioned about the Messiah coming from Nazareth. Nazareth was also a poor village and possibly known for its moral corruption. Usually poverty and crime go hand in hand so it wouldn’t be a stretch of the imagination to think of Nazareth as such a town.

Nathanael is having a hard time conceiving the notion that the Messiah that he believed was going to be coming to bring political revolution to the Jews was going to be coming from a place like Nazareth.

When He sees Jesus, Jesus says, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Before Nathanael fully recognizes Jesus for who He is, he’s probably thinking, “Alright, this guys is trying to sell me something so he asks, “Where did you get to know me?”

He wants to be sure that Jesus is really the Chosen One of God, and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wanting to be sure. Notice what Jesus says – “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” This is where we learn about Nathanael being a student of the Scriptures.

Cultural context is important because things in Scripture aren’t always as they appear on the surface. When we read this without cultural we might, “Oh, Jesus had a vision of Nathanael chilling out under a fig tree.” It’s not that simple.

According to the NIV First Century Study Bible, ‘under the fig tree’ was a euphemism for studying the Hebrew Scriptures. Jesus pointed out that Nathanael was a ‘true Israelite’ because he had been studying the Scriptures. We see this taken a step farther whenever Jesus mentions that they would see “angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.” There’s only one other place in Scripture where that phrase is used and it’s in Genesis 28:10-15 where Jacob has a vision of a stairway going into Heaven and angels ascending and descending on the stairway.

In Genesis 28, after Jacob has the vision, God reminds him of the promise to bless his seed. Jesus was communicating to Nathanael the promise to bless his Jacob’s seed has been fulfilled in Himself. He is the stairway to Heaven between God and man.

Jesus

Finally, we come to the personality of Jesus. If I were going to fully talk about how Jesus is, it would take too long so I simply want to look at how He is portrayed in this passage.

First, Jesus is humble. Although His humility is not directly alluded to in the passage, I think it’s something that we can still deduce when we consider Jesus coming from a town like Nazareth. I already mentioned that the town itself was probably a ghetto filled with poverty and moral corruption.

It would’ve been enough for Jesus to put on human flesh and live on earth, but it wasn’t enough for Him. He knew the kind of life He was getting into. He chose to be born to Joseph and Mary. He knew they would live in Nazareth – that little podunk village that nothing good can come from. He chose that life. Jesus is of more value and worth than we could ever attribute to Him and yet, He chooses to live among the meek, the lowly, the humble, and the outcast so that those meek, lowly, humble, and outcast could see that He relates to them.

Second, Jesus is understanding. When Nathanael asks Him how He got to know him, Jesus doesn’t have to give Nathanael an answer. Jesus doesn’t him anything, and yet he understands Nathanael’s desire for an explanation.

Jesus seeks us out as we are, not as we’re going to be. He looks into our souls and He sees us – the real us, not the mask we put on for the others, but the real, broken, insecure us that has a an existential crisis at least three times a week at the most inconvenient times.

Jesus understands us, and that is why the writer of Hebrews says, “We do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who in every respect has been tested as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore approach the throne of grace with boldness, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” (Hebrews 4:15-16, NRSV)

A Mental Buffet // 07 Apr 2017

Mental Buffet
Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

Rod Dreher Talks About The Benedict Option

Even though this isn’t an article, I highly recommend that you watch this episode of Book TV on C-Span where Rod Dreher discusses his book, The Benedict Option.

“Rod Dreher talked about his book The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation, in which he argues that American Christians should look to St. Benedict, a sixth-century monk, for ideas on how to reverse the spiritual crisis in the country today. Mr. Dreher then participated in a panel discussion on the topic.”

 

The Problem with Christian Films – Andrew Barber

“And so it seems as good a time as any to evaluate: in their current state, is this flood of Christian films a good trend?

My answer is simple: no. I know it can seem petty to pick on Christian films, but they have become a noteworthy representation of Christianity. Every conversation I have with a non-Christian requires dealing with their perceptions of me as a Christian, which more often than not means dealing with the Republican Party, televangelists, and Christian media. The issue of representation aside, the problems in Christian films must be addressed, because they are not just issues of technique or stylistic preferences. They are issues of integrity.

There are currently two primary problems with Christian films: (1) they are either inherently dishonest and/or (2) they are primarily concerned with what C. S. Lewis called “egoistic castle-building.” Note: discussing both issues will require me to generalize about Christian films at large, so there will be (I hope) some exceptions. But I believe the trends discussed here are self-evidently true for a great majority of the Christian film genre.”

 

Are We Asleep to the Reality of Supernatural Power? – JD Walt

“We are like Jesus? Unfortunately, this gets translated into the thin ethical framework of W.W.J.D. (What would Jesus do?) It gets framed as a behavioral management approach. Jesus cared for the poor so we should care for the poor. Jesus loved his enemies so we should love our enemies. While these propositions are true, they miss the bigger point. To be “like Jesus” in this world means to be a frail, weak and profoundly limited human being who is filled “to the measure of all the fullness of God.” (see Ephesians 3:14-20)  This is not about becoming a superhero. This is what it means to become a saint—a “holy one.”

 

No Stranger Thing Than Baptism – Matthew Sigler

“The Kingdom of God, then, has downward momentum and overlaps with the principalities of the present age. This “already-but-not-yet” perspective means that Christians operate as those who see and participate in the new creation even in the midst of the tumult around us.”

Gospel Assurance and Kingdom Citizens

Phil 1:18b-30

One of the things I find most frustrating about the human condition is that I cannot know everything. We often hear advertisements along the lines of “build for your future” “save for tomorrow” “what will you’re life look like in 20 years?” We do everything in our power to navigate life, prepared for any kind of emergency. We, like squirrels, gather our acorns up, preparing for the long Winter of Life, when the winds blow cold and the dark comes too soon. But, as we heard last week, in a moment, that can all change. This boss comes in and says, “You’re on the hot seat”, the doctor says, “It’s worse than we thought”, you find out children just aren’t in your future, the debt collector calls again and again, as if you don’t have a family you’re trying to take care of. We try to navigate life, but the Unknown hovers, like a phantom. And many of us may be tempted to wake up each day in fear. “Is this the day when it all falls apart.” And we don’t know. We can’t know what waits us.

Growing up, I remember times when I would wait in absolute anguish knowing that I was going to get in trouble when my parents came home. Kids, maybe you know the anguish of Report Card day. The first time I brought home a C on my report card, was the longest 35 minute bus ride of my life. Because I knew, the “strongly worded conversation of love at loud volumes” was coming. The spanking was coming. The grounding was coming.

We find Paul in a very similar but higher stakes situation. You’ll remember that he is under arrest, having appealed to Caesar for his freedom. He is waiting, knowing that he very well could die. The Romans could come at any minute and haul him away. This is life or death. He may not get out of this one. But as we also saw a glimpse of last week, Paul seems to not be troubled by this. He is using language like “I will rejoice”. At first glance perhaps you’re like me, thinking “Rejoice Paul? You’re going to rejoice? There? On possible death row?”

And so this draws us to the very first question: What is Paul rejoicing in?

Paul rejoices because, while he may be uncertain about what conclusion Caesar will come to, he is absolutely positive that the result is the same. He says in verses 19-20, “this will work out for my deliverance, it is my eager expectation and hope that I will not be ashamed”. Paul is confident in one thing. He is united to Christ. Paul is fixated, hooked, and grounded on the promise that he is already justified before God, and thus will be resurrected and made like Him. He knows in Whom he has believed. He knows that he belongs to His faithful Savior, Jesus Christ. Paul is resting on the promise “He who began a good work in you will complete it.” When Paul says “this will work out for my deliverance,” he uses the same root word we use for salvation. Paul is rejoicing in the assurance he has in the Gospel. Christ has come, lived, and died in the place of His people, he was resurrected and ascended. Paul is rejoicing in that, because by faith in Christ, Paul also will be resurrected. Regardless of what the Romans can do to Paul today, tomorrow Paul will be with Christ. This is the root of the great statement in our Text this morning, “to live is Christ, to die is gain.”

The great temptation this morning is for you to hear that great statement of faith and say “Oh I wish I could be more like Paul. I wish I could have the great faith he had.” My plea with you this morning is that you don’t look to Paul as a model of faith, but rather look to the object of Paul’s faith, Jesus Christ. You have this same promise, by faith. No other place will give us such hope. No other place promises deliverance. This is the only place where we can find real Gospel assurance.

So what does this mean? We can say all day, I have assurance that I am in Christ. But so what? What should be the result of that assurance?

I believe Gospel assurance frees us to glorify God, and calls us to live as Kingdom Citizens.

First, our assurance frees us to glorify God.

Paul is saying very plainly that his highest goal, the height of his desire, is that God is honored in his body, or another way to say that is “glorified”. But then Paul clarifies his statement and says that God will be glorified in either his life or his death. And this seems odd, because Paul’s in jail. He has no life. He can’t do anything. This can’t be a place where Paul can glorify God. But it certainly is. Casesar may look to control the Gospel, to thwart Paul’s ministry. But that’s not the case for Paul. In this cell he is the freest man in Rome. Paul knows God has not brought him here only to abandon Paul. Paul could have very well looked at his cell, the guard chained to him, thrown up his hands and said, “Well I can’t reach anyone here. This isn’t where I’m supposed to be.” But that’s not his reaction, and it shouldn’t be ours. When we see that Christ is not going to let us go, not going to abandon us, it removes all fear that we’re not where God wants us to be.

Growing up in the 2000s, that was the main statement I would hear at youth camp or events: You need to figure out what is God’s will for your life. What is your purpose? And it wasn’t intentional, but what that creates is this overwhelming anxiety, “What am I supposed to do? What do you want from me?” And if we’re honest, we often translate that as if we have to throw everything to the wind, and charge the gates of hell. That we’re the ones that have to go and do big things. That we have to fight all the fights. And it presses down on us, like a weight, to crush us. Some of us are called to church planting or ministry. Some of us are called to work in the ghettoes or in the mission fields far away.

But what if that’s not you? What if you’re gifting is that you entertain other families well? What if you’re really good with numbers? Maybe you just really care for children, or you’re administrative skills are awesome. Or let’s step away from the church. Maybe you’re just a good worker. Perhaps you’re just a student, a banker, a doctor, professor, administrator, or businessperson. Because we know, God has redeemed us and gifted us for Himself, we can rest in these things. We can trust that God is glorified in our being faithful sons or daughters, husbands or wives, brothers or sisters, children and friends. You don’t have to be a zealot, or all in, or sold out. Just be ordinary. Just be where you are.

[9] Now concerning brotherly love you have no need for anyone to write to you, for you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another, [10] for that indeed is what you are doing to all the brothers throughout Macedonia. But we urge you, brothers, to do this more and more, [11] and to aspire to live quietly, and to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we instructed you, [12] so that you may walk properly before outsiders and be dependent on no one.

(1 Thessalonians 4:9-12 ESV)

This is what Paul means when he says “to live is Christ”. It is a statement, a confession, that “Christ will be glorified in my body. If that’s as minister, a housewife, a salesperson, or a faithful child, my life will be marked by a dependence only on Christ and the grace he brings.”

But assurance also frees us to glorify God in our death. For Paul this looked like being courageous when threatened with execution. For us, where the likelihood of dying for the Gospel seems so distant, it’s hard for us to relate to this. But not being able to relate to something doesn’t mean we shouldn’t affirm that it exists for them. That our brothers and sisters worshipped as we slept this morning and risked their lives for the Gospel. We have heard stories of churches being ripped apart by totalitarian governments, missionaries being killed in the field by those whom they loved enough to bring the Gospel to them. We should recognize and pray for the persecuted Church.

For us, where persecution is so foreign, how then can we glorify God in our death? One way is to have an appropriate view of death, one in which we don’t fear it. Paul was so confident in His union with Christ; that at the threat of death is seen as gain. If you keep Paul alive in prison, strip him of everything, he’s going to preach the Gospel to everyone near him, soldier, citizen, whoever. If you kill Paul, his mindset is, “Well then I will be with Jesus.” Dear Christian, this should be a delight to you. I said earlier about how life could change in an instant. And those tragedies can create doubt. Doubt that God cares for us, doubt that we’ll survive. Where will we find our comfort? Our only comfort in life and death is that we are not our own, but belong to Jesus Christ. Not a hair can fall without the will of your Heavenly Father. But if when die, Christian, you will only take your first breath in eternity.

Death is dead. This is why Paul calls it gain. But if you are here this morning, and you do not look to Christ, ut rather something else for your joy, I must ask you this question. Will that thing, whatever it is you cling to; will it sustain you this way? All other things can be taken away. Your job can be gone. Your money can be stolen. Only in Christ are you assured of your fate, even in the face of Death.

Christ has died, and was raised, for you. This truth is freeing. Because I know that I now, and in eternity will stand before God, not according to my righteousness, but Christ’s, I am free to glorify Him in my life.  You do not have to wander in the forest of doubt. You do not have to live in fear that God is not made much of in you.

Second, Gospel assurance calls us to live as Citizens of the Kingdom of God.

Here we come to this part of the text, and after hearing all of that Gospel, all the freedom that we have, now it sounds like Paul is looking at the Philippians and saying, “Earn it”. That’s not what’s going on here. When we begin to look at this phrase, it literally means, “live as citizens of the Gospel.” Paul is taking something that is common among all of them, and elevating it. He is aiming right at the heart of their identity and saying, “Oh this is much better”.

Here’s what I mean. To be Philippian was to be among the most patriotic people of that time. Philipi was granted a unique status in the empire. It was modeld to be a Little Rome.  Philippi, though in Greece, spoke Latin. They had automatic Roman citizenship from birth. Many who called it home were former soldiers. They were as Roman as gladiator fights and chariot races. They took immense amount of pride in being from Philippi.

But Paul is calling them to live as citizens of a much better city than Philippi, a better Kingdom than Rome. Because this Kingdom transcends all Earthly allegiance. In this dense, political season we find ourselves, we often are assaulted with an appeal to our citizenship. “Be sure to do your ‘civic duty’”. But we are also called to a Kingdom duty to one another, and it is of much greater importance.

So how do we live as citizens of the Kingdom? There are many ways, but Paul gives us two here that we should pay close attention to this morning.

First, we strive together in unity. He writes “If I come at see you or if I’m absent, I may hear” that they are living in light of the Gospel. This is important for them, because the time could be soon that Paul could not be around anymore. He could be gone, and the Philippians have to have a better unifier than just being Paul’s fruitful harvest in Macedonia

Paul is saying very plainly, if I come to you or if I don’t, what’s most important for you is that you live life this way. Paul is intimately tied to this church. He is its planter; preaching the Gospel to Lydia, baptizing her and her house. Freeing the demonic girl. Preaching the Gospel to the jailer, baptizing him and his house. There’s roots with Paul. But healthy churches are united by more than their planter. They live decades longer, because they’re united, not by a man and his vision. But by the Gospel he proclaims.  We have to be untied in Christ and by the Gospel he proclaims.

And this is hard because we don’t naturally pull towards one another. There are so many things that we can use to separate ourselves from each other. In this highly polar political season, we are tempted to let our own ideologies and our own party put blinders on us and ask “how can they over there on the other side even say they love Jesus.” We debate things and are divided by that even at the end of the day aren’t important. Some of us care more about social justice and racial reconciliation, some of us care more about taxation and economics, and that’s ok. Some of us homeschool, some us public, and that’s ok. Some of us extroverts, some of us introverts, and that’s ok. We are tied together by something so much better, so much bigger than that.

Paul also says that we are to strive together. This carries with it an idea of soldiers standing side by side and fighting together. We are called to share the fights, the burdens with those around us. To care for one another. To help each other anyway we can. But the only way we can do this is by being in each other’s lives. This is an area where I personally have failed. If we are going to stand together and strive together, then we have to fellowship together. Spend time together. Care for another.

There was a professor who went to the hospital and found out he had only a few months left to live. Lying in his bed one day, he heard singing hymns outside his window. He went to it and saw his students, perhaps 100 of them, serenading him in his final hours. He said, “I didn’t feel alone” The worst place we could be is alone. That is my greatest fear. To be in a vulnerable place alone.  We need each other, and to live as united citizens is to look at one another, knowing these issues exist and saying, “Brother, sister, how may I encourage you with the Gospel?”

Second, live as citizens by facing opposition boldly. Paul says that we are “not to fear our opponents”. We admitted earlier that, while persecution is not the common threat to the Church in America, there still remains pressure to walk away. We are assaulted with the call from those around us to return. To defect and repatriate ourselves back to a dying City. A coworker may throw you under the bus just so that they can get ahead, and we are tempted to get revenge against them. Our culture tells us that truth is relative, morality subjective; and tells the Church that if we don’t support this notion, that we will lose our influence and attractiveness. On the other hand we are warned by some that we could lose our freedoms and rights to worship, that they are the only ones who can help us. But we need not worry about our attractiveness nor our rights. Both ends of this City of Man call out for us to join them and to come find our peace in citizenship with them. But this City is crumbling; our Kingdom cannot be shaken.

We will suffer in this life. It may be through our family, or our finances, or our health. Suffering will come. That is one of the few things you can rest assured of. But a far greater assurance you have is this. Christ has died on behalf of His enemies. And those same enemies may, by faith in Him, be made right with God and brought in as citizens of a Great Kingdom, glorifying their God and enjoying him in life, in death, and forever.

A Mental Buffet // 30 Mar 2017

Mental Buffet

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

After Great Pain, Where Is God? – Peter Wehner

“I’m no theologian. My professional life has been focused on politics and the ideas that inform politics. Yet I’m also a Christian trying to wrestle honestly with the complexities and losses in life, within the context of my faith. And while it’s fine for Christians to say God will comfort people in their pain, if a child dies, if the cancer doesn’t go into remission, if the marriage breaks apart, how much good is that exactly?”

 

There is a Crack in Everything. That’s How the Light Gets In. – Matt Johnson

“God is at work despite the pee-drenched straw, the stubbed toes, and the waiting around in funeral parlors. When your life is in the crapper, when your church is torn apart by wolves, God is present even when you can’t see it, or feel his presence.”

 

The Plow of God – Douglas Wilson

“God plows his people. He deals with us, and He deals with us here in the Supper. He deals with sin in the Supper.”

 

A Mental Buffet // 23 Mar 2017

Mental Buffet
Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.
7 Reasons Your Church Should have a Front Porch – Patrick Scriven
“Where there is a challenge for society, there is also an opportunity for the church to step in and help neighborhoods to build real community. But we don’t get to contribute without doing the hard work of reorienting our ministry outward.”
Preaching the Ten Commandments – Ray Ortlund
“When I preach through the Ten Commandments, each sermon has four points, because each commandment does four things at once.”
God is Enough – Jonathan Bradley
“God is enough for the thousands of persecuted Christians all over the world that face imprisonment and death as you read this very sentence.Is He enough for you?”

Shakespeare vs. Puritanism – Ryan Reeves

“The devil a puritan that he is, or anything constantly, but a time-pleaser; an affectioned ass that cons state without book and utters it by great swarths; the best persuaded of himself, so crammed, as he thinks, with excellencies, that it is his grounds of faith that all that look on him love him. And on that vice in him will my revenge find notable cause to work.” – Shakespeare

(Just a personal note, I’m fairly okay with anyone who calls Puritans asses. LAWL.)

Against Truth – Chad West

“When I was young, I didn’t understand how a person with a lot of knowledge about the bible could also be a jerk.”